Author Topic: 2017 Obituaries  (Read 738 times)

EveningStar

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #60 on: August 21, 2017, 01:54:38 PM »
Science fiction author Brian Aldiss dies aged 92

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Brian Aldiss, the “grand old man” of science fiction whose writing has shaped the genre since he was first published in the 1950s, has died at the age of 92.

Aldiss’s agent, Curtis Brown, and his son, Tim Aldiss, have announced that the author, artist, poet and memoirist died at home in Oxford in the early hours of 19 August. “Brian had celebrated his birthday with close friends and family and spoken to many close to him,” wrote Tim on Twitter as he announced the death of “our beloved father and grandfather”.

Aldiss was the author of science fiction classics including Non-Stop, Hothouse and Greybeard, as well as the Helliconia trilogy, which his agent said bridged “the gap between classic science fiction and contemporary literature”. His numerous short stories include Super-Toys Last All Summer Long, which was adapted into the Steven Spielberg film AI ...

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #61 on: September 01, 2017, 03:59:31 PM »
Shelley Berman, Stand-Up Comic Who Skewered Modern Life, Dies at 92

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Shelley Berman, whose brittle persona and anxiety-ridden observations helped redefine stand-up comedy in the late 1950s and early ’60s, died early Friday morning at his home in Bell Canyon, Calif. He was 92.

His publicist, Glenn Schwartz, said the cause was complications of Alzheimer’s disease.

Mr. Berman, one of the first comedians to have as much success on records as in person or on television, was in the vanguard of a movement that transformed the comedy monologue from a rapid-fire string of gags to something more subtle, more thoughtful and more personal.

The comedians of the preceding generation, Gerald Nachman wrote in “Seriously Funny: The Rebel Comedians of the 1950s and 1960s” (2003), were “one-liner salesmen” for whom “a joke was a cheap and reusable commodity, easily bought and sold, not a worldview or a political stance.” Comedians like Mr. Berman, Mort Sahl and Lenny Bruce had a different approach.

In 1959, Time magazine referred to this new breed as “sick” comics, and the term (which Mr. Berman hated) caught on. But they had little in common with one another besides a determination to remake stand-up comedy in their own image. Mr. Sahl was a wry political commentator; Mr. Bruce was a profane social satirist; Mr. Berman was a beleaguered observer of life’s frustrations and embarrassments.

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EveningStar

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #62 on: September 01, 2017, 04:32:08 PM »
Richard Anderson, of ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman,’ Dies at 91

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Richard Anderson, a character actor known for playing sturdy authority figures in films and on television, most notably the government agent who doled out perilous missions on two popular series, “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman,” died on Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 91.

Jonathan Taylor, a spokesman for the family, confirmed the death.

With the polished good looks of a telegenic politician and standing an imposing 6 feet 3 inches tall, Mr. Anderson seemed made to order for the authority-figure roles — a police official, a military officer, a senator and more — that casting directors were so often eager to fill.

United Press International once described him as “always a chief, never an Indian.”

His acting career took off with two-dozen films for MGM in the early 1950s. He appeared with Cary Grant in the romantic comedy “Dream Wife” (1953), Leslie Nielsen in the cult science-fiction movie “Forbidden Planet” (1956) and Kirk Douglas in Stanley Kubrick’s antiwar World War I film, “Paths of Glory” (1957).

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #63 on: September 04, 2017, 10:20:19 AM »
Sugar Ramos passes away aged 75 in Mexico City

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Former world featherweight champion Sugar Ramos, real name Ultiminio Ramos, has died at the age of 75 after a long fight from cancer.

One of the first victims of the professional boxing ban in Cuba, Ramos moved to Mexico – where he later became an idol – to escape the communist regime of Fidel Castro in 1961. Two years later he challenged Davey Moore for the WBA and WBC featherweight titles, and it is the tragic outcome of that bout that became Ramos’ unwanted claim to fame.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #64 on: September 07, 2017, 11:16:09 AM »
Gene Michael, Whose Yankee Teams Won 4 World Series, Dies at 79

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Gene Michael, a Yankee for nearly a half-century, rising from sure-handed shortstop to general manager and building teams that won four World Series championships, died on Thursday. He was 79.

The Yankees reported his death on its website, saying the cause was a heart attack. It did not say where he died.

For much of Michael’s time with the Yankees, George Steinbrenner ran a revolving door that sent players, coaches, managers and front-office personnel spinning in and out of Yankee Stadium. Michael was fired a couple of times, then hired back.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #65 on: September 09, 2017, 09:52:24 AM »
Joe DeNucci, boxer and long-serving politician, dies at 78

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Joe DeNucci, a former world class middleweight boxing contender who became a politician and the longest-serving state auditor in Massachusetts history, has died at age 78.

DeNucci, who had suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, died Friday at his home in Newton, where his death was confirmed by the Andrew J. Magni & Son Funeral Home.

In his boxing days he fought quality opponents including Emile Griffith, a world champion in multiple weight classes, before turning to the equally rough-and-tumble world of state politics. As a Democrat, he served as a state representative and later held the office of state auditor for 24 years.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #66 on: September 09, 2017, 11:06:52 AM »
RIP Jerry Pournelle, the first author to write a novel on a computer

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Science fiction author Jerry Pournelle passed away earlier this week after a sudden illness at the age of 84. He helped popularize the military science fiction genre with novels such as Janissaries and The Mercenary, but is also credited with a major milestone: the first author to write a novel entirely on a computer.

Pournelle wrote on his blog on Thursday that he had come down with a cold and the flu while attending DragonCon in Atlanta, Georgia, and his son Alex confirmed his passing last night, (via File770) saying that he didn’t suffer. Steven Barnes, with whom Pournelle collaborated on several novels, told me in an email that “he was an absolute original, one of the best and smartest men I’ve ever known.”

Born in 1933, Pournelle served in the US Army during the Korean War, and later earned his doctorate in political science. He ended up in the defense industry, working for Boeing and NASA where he worked on the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions. He also wrote science fiction on the side, publishing his first short story in Analog Science Fiction / Science Fact in 1971.

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Science Fiction author Jerry Pournelle has died

Space visionary and science fiction writer Jerry Pournelle has died

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #67 on: September 14, 2017, 03:14:03 PM »
Otto Wanz passes away at 74 years old

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Otto Wanz, the most famous wrestler in Germany and Austria during the 70s and 80s, passed away Thursday morning from what was described as a short but heavy illness. He was 74.

Wanz, a powerhouse at 6-foot-2 and 380 pounds, would be best known in the United States for his run as AWA Champion in 1982. Wanz had been champion of his own Catch Wrestling Association, but was largely unknown outside of Germany and Austria. He defeated Nick Bockwinkel for the title on August 29th, 1982, in St. Paul in a match that caused lingering hard feelings between Bockwinkel and longtime manager Bobby Heenan, because Bockwinkel never told Heenan that the title was changing hands ahead of time.

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Another article: Former AWA World champion Otto Wanz dies

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #68 on: September 15, 2017, 08:34:05 PM »
Harry Dean Stanton, Character Actor Who Became a Star, Dies at 91

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Harry Dean Stanton, the gaunt, hollow-eyed, scene-stealing character actor who broke out of obscurity in his late 50s in two starring movie roles and capped his career with an acclaimed characterization as a corrupt polygamist on the HBO series “Big Love,” died on Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

His death, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, was confirmed by his agent, John S. Kelly.

Mr. Stanton spent two decades typecast in Hollywood as cowboys and villains before his unusual talents began to attract notice on the strength of his performances in the movies “Straight Time” (1978); “Alien,” “Wise Blood” and “The Rose” (all 1979); and “Escape From New York” (1981).

In those roles — as a former criminal bored in the law-abiding world, a 22nd-century space traveler, a street preacher pretending to be blind, a devastatingly cruel country-music star and a crazed demolitions expert — his look and his down-home voice were the same, but his characters were distinct and memorable.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #69 on: September 17, 2017, 08:45:46 PM »
Wrestling legend Bobby Heenan passes away

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A dark cloud hovers over the professional wrestling world today, as one of the most beloved characters in history has checked out way too soon. But the memories of Bobby "The Brain" Heenan still live on, proving that even the darkest clouds have silver linings.

Commentator Jim Ross broke the news on his Twitter account today.

"Nobody ever did it better than the Weasel," wrote Ross.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #70 on: September 20, 2017, 10:11:41 AM »
Jake LaMotta dead: 'Raging Bull' boxing legend dies aged 95

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Jake LaMotta – the legendary boxer depicted by Robert DeNiro in Raging Bull – has died, aged 95...

He liked to fight on the inside and was famous for stalking his opponents, who often had bigger punches, but less grit and determination. He is regarded as having one of the best chins in the history of the sport.

In an era of premium middleweights, LaMotta had some epic encounters. Most notable among these were six hair-raising fights with his great rival Sugar Ray Robinson...

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #71 on: October 09, 2017, 03:16:33 PM »
Y.A. Tittle, Quarterback Who Led Giants to 3 Title Games, Dies at 90



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Y. A. Tittle, the Hall of Fame quarterback who led the Giants to three consecutive National Football League championship games in the early 1960s after the San Francisco 49ers had discarded him as too old and too slow, died on Sunday night. He was 90.

Louisiana State University, where he played his college ball, announced his death. It did not say where he died.

Tittle threw for dozens of touchdowns and thousands of yards, won a Most Valuable Player award and was selected to seven Pro Bowls. But he endeared himself to New York not as a golden boy but as a muddied, grass-stained scrapper.

He was a balding field general with a fringe of gray who, at 34, in his old-fashioned high-topped shoes, had undeniably lost a step or two, but kept picking himself up off the ground to find a way to beat you, and New York cheered.

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Re: 2017 Obituaries
« Reply #72 on: October 17, 2017, 10:22:38 AM »
Roy Dotrice, Nimble British Actor Familiar on Both Sides of Atlantic, Dies at 94

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Roy Dotrice, a British stage, film and television actor who began performing as a prisoner of war in Germany and worked in Britain and America for six decades, notably in one-man shows portraying Abe Lincoln, the diarist John Aubrey and other historical figures, died on Monday at his home in London. He was 94...

While he kept a home in London, Mr. Dotrice lived in Los Angeles and worked mostly in the United States after 1980. He appeared in New York stage productions of Ibsen’s “An Enemy of the People” (1985) and Harold Pinter’s “The Homecoming” (1991). On film, he portrayed Mozart’s father in Milos Forman’s “Amadeus” (1984) and a skating coach in Paul M. Glaser’s “The Cutting Edge” (1992).

On television, he played Charles Dickens in Masterpiece Theater’s 13-part “Dickens of London” (1976); a British monarch in the mini-series “Shaka Zulu” (1986); the father of the beast on the CBS crime series “Beauty and the Beast” (1987-90); and a priest on the CBS dramatic series “Picket Fences” (1993-96). In recent years he recorded many audiobooks, creating voices for hundreds of characters in the saga adapted for “Game of Thrones.” ...

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